GEM Fellowship

Adobe is a corporate member of the National GEM Consortium, a network of corporations, government laboratories, and universities that supports and enables students from underrepresented communities to pursue graduate education in STEM fields. GEM members provide the financial support needed for students accepted into the GEM Fellowship Program to earn their master’s or PhD degrees. In addition, companies and government labs commit to providing summer internships to GEM Fellows.

Adobe has sponsored more than 85 GEM Fellows in computer science since joining the consortium in 2012, with a current average of 10 new GEM Fellows supported each year. Fellows who join Adobe as interns are invited to events and activities from professional development to networking to coffee breaks. Beyond enabling educational opportunities and internships for these students, Adobe has also hired GEM Fellows as full-time staff.

Students can learn more about how to apply for GEM fellowships on the National GEM Consortium’s GEM Fellowship Program page.

Apply Now

Hear from Adobe GEM Alums

TJ Rhodes Research Scientist/ Engineer, Adobe Research

After becoming a GEM Fellow, I saw that there’s a whole world of opportunity out there. GEM noticed my aptitude and potential and decided to invest in me. Having my dream job at Adobe as my first job wouldn’t have happened without GEM.

Johanna Smith-Palliser Software Developer/ Engineer, Adobe

The GEM Fellowship allowed me to get the best of both worlds—a graduate degree in my field of choice, computer science, as well as practical industry experience through my internship with Adobe. I had a lot of control over what the start of my career would look like.

Chinedu Ojukwu Software Engineer, Adobe

Working as an intern for Adobe during my GEM Fellowship was a match made in heaven. My intern project was put into production, and I felt my work was very useful. I saw I had what it takes to be a software engineer and got an introduction to Adobe’s work.

View our newsView All News

Follow Adobe Research